List China Events Chinese Culture China Watch Chinese Music Land of China Chinese Festival Chinese History Chinese Architecture Chinese Medicine People in China What Chinese Say Martial Arts China Tales World Watch World Beyond Amusing & Musing


Home >> Chinese Art | China Watch

Hero's sacrifice will not be in vain
砍头不要紧,为了主义真。杀死洪常青,还有后来人!

28 September 2012
 

A clip in the classic Chinese movie The Red Detachment of Women (红色娘子军,1961). Hong Changqing (洪常青), the CCP Commissar and the central character, is played by Wang Xingang (王心刚), one of the most memorable actors in China's silver screen.

 

In order to annihilate the tyrant's effective power, the main force of the Red Army strategically shifts to the rear of the enemy camp, with CCP Commissar Hong Changqing led a small group of soldiers covering the retreat of the main force. After a series of fierce fights, the mission is accomplished, yet Hong Changqing is injured and captured by the tyrant's troop.

Knowing their end is approaching, the tyrant (played by one of China's best movie stars Cheng Qiang 陈强) and his lackeys are panic-stricken. They tries all the tricks to seduce Hong Changqing to surrender, but Hong replies that he dares to beat the devils' guts out and will never lower his head to bow ("敢向恶鬼争高下,不向霸王让寸分"). The tyrant thus threatens Hong with death, but the hero declares that he has prepared to die for the great course right from the beginning, and one warrior's fall will only become a catalyst for millions more to rise up in his place.

Hong Changqing is burnt under an aging tree, but his aspiration and spirit live on ever after.

The battles between Chinese nation and the local representatives of the world-tyrants will go on, and anyone who suggests Chinese people should coordinate with the world power shall be viewed as nothing else but hanjian (汉奸).

 
 
RELATED:

Today in history:

On September 28, 1898, six men who intended to save China from a total destruction under both external and internal pressures were executed by Manchu rulers. One of the six men named Tan Sitong (谭嗣同) left his swan poem in the execution site, in which there are two lines that became the aspiration for China's later heroes when facing death:

我自横刀向天笑,
去留肝胆两昆仑!

In defeat, I still hold my sword, until the last minute;

Facing death, I laugh at the heaven, leaving my passion to my nation that'll never weaken.

The death of the six martyrs signifies the critical turning point for the fate of the Manchu regime - it never recovered but collapsed in a free fall speed. Yet in its impious ruin site, a Chinese nation free of alien domination was reborn.

Is history repeating itself right now?

Below is freshly composed Chinese poem by followers of a contemporary Tan Sitong:

李自*:

一剪梅
壬辰秋至歌乐山

怎道天凉好个秋?
雨洗山城,
烟锁重楼。
余红万点一江血,
两岸潸然,
歌乐凝愁。

犹记忠魂志未酬,
血泪书成,
铁笔银钩。
青山不改水长流,
还看春来,
银杏枝头。

*孤*伯

2012年9月28日得恶讯有感
无题

邸报传来泪雨飞,
方知国事不可为;
与其痴望成春梦,
何不揭竿雄一回。


Home List About This Website Contact Us

Copyright © 2008 - 2017